Tagged: Economics

…And the Last Shall Be First

There is an old proverb “Wise GM not lose talent within division”.  Thus I’m not quite sure exactly what to make of the Nats acquisition of Paul Lo Duca from division rival Mets.  What does it say about a club when they upgrade the team by scavenging another team’s refuse?  There is a reason the Mets went to a lot of trouble to replace Lo Duca.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m a Lo Duca fan from way back.  And I think he’s a valuable addition to the Nats, providing veteran leadership and mentoring for the young Nats.  This won’t make the Nats competitive, but it is a positive development for the Nats.  I’m thrilled to have Lo Duca with the Nats.  No, my comment is a reflection on the difference between being a predator in the hunt for a division title and a bottom feeder trying to climb out of the cellar.

Ironically, the one looking up is the one who came out on top.  Lo Duca became available because the Mets traded for the Nats backstop.  Effectively the Nats have swapped catcher Brian Schneider and outfielder Ryan Church for catcher Paul Lo Duca and outfielder Lastings Milledge.  I would make that trade any day of the week and twice on Sunday.

— Michael Norton

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Daisuke Matsuzaka Derby

How good can this kid really be? Does anyone remember Kaz Mania? Or is quality pitching really in that short of supply?

Baseball people still see a good competition between the Yankees, Mets, Red Sox and Rangers, with the Dodgers, Diamondbacks and one or two others still hoping for the chance to sign the best pitcher to come out of Japan yet. How good is he? Last season he went 17-5 with a 2.15 ERA, 200 strikeouts and 136 hits allowed in 186 innings, and some say that actually represented some slippage. Bidding could approach $20-30 as a "posting" fee for the right to win negotiating exclusivity with the star young right-hander, and with only a year to go before full-fledged free agency agent Scott Boras shows no inclination to settle below what he sees as fair value for a 26-year-old No. 1 pitcher. Including the posting price, which goes to Seibu, Matsuzaka could wind up a $100 million man.

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— Michael Norton